Dublin Texas Root Beer

Dublin Texas Root Beer

IMG_9968 - EditedIMG_9969 - Edited

Website: http://www.dublinbottlingworks.com/

Sweetener: Cane Sugar

Bottled at: Dublin, Texas

Purchase Location: Real Soda, Gardena, California

In 1891 Sam Houston Prim founded Dublin Bottling Works in the small town of Dublin, Texas.  That same year while visiting Waco, Texas, 90 miles from Dublin, Sam Houston Prim tasted the fountain drink known as Dr. Pepper for the first time.  Shortly thereafter, Dublin Bottling Works became the first facility to bottle Dr. Pepper.  Dr. Pepper grew in regional popularity in the years that followed, but made its national and international mark when introduced to almost 20 million people at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.

As more facilities began bottling Dr. Pepper, and cheap corn syrup became the preferred sweetener for Dr. Pepper and other sodas, Dublin Bottling Works refused to make the change to high fructose corn syrup, insisting instead on using cane sugar.  Consumers, recognizing the unique nature of this cane sugar Dr. Pepper, began referring to the variant as “Dublin” Dr. Pepper.  In 2012, Dublin Bottling Works ceased production of Dublin Dr. Pepper as part of a settlement in a lawsuit alleging that it had sold its product outside its approved territory.

Dublin Texas Root Beer carries on the pure cane sugar tradition established by Dublin Bottling Works in the 19th century.  The label is a slick combination of seafoam green and yellow.  The cap shows an outline of the State of Texas colored in by the Texas flag.  The bottom right hand corner has a small, silver insignia of a soda jerk holding a six pack of soda bottles.  Just under this insignia, it states “Since 1891.”  Dublin Bottling Works was founded in 1891, but I could not find any information regarding when its root beer was created.  Consequently, I am not sure whether that date refers solely to the founding of the business.

As for its taste, Dublin Texas Root Beer has classic root beer qualities.  It is sweet and creamy, ending with a slightly herbal taste, perhaps with a hint of anise.

Overall Score: 7 of 10.

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